Global Integration Bootcamp 2017

By Nick Hauenstein

The Global Integration Bootcamp was held for the first time this last week, events spanning 12 countries, 16 locations, with over 650 attendees. If you went to either the Seattle, WA location (here at QuickLearn Training’s headquarters), or the New York location, then you may have even ran into one of our instructors!

Global Integration Bootcamp 2017 Locations

Seattle Bootcamp Recap

In the weeks leading up to the day of the bootcamp, Tom Canter with Phidiax arranged a speaker line-up, refreshments, and got the word-out about the event; while over here at QuickLearn Training, we prepared to transform our classrooms into an event space. When the day arrived, all were in good spirits and ready to share knowledge, and get deep into real-world possibilities for hybrid cloud integrations using BizTalk Server and Logic Apps.

Tom Canter presenting at Global Integration Bootcamp

Tom kicked off the event with a keynote and introductions, and got everyone primed and excited for the day. Next up was Tord showing off some of the latest greatest features in BizTalk Server 2016 when used in concert with API Management along with a few surprises Winking smile. I’m not sure what I’m allowed to share and what I’m not, so I will just leave that short, sweet, and to the point.

Gyanendra Gautam teamed up with Ashish Bhambhani (co-authors of the freshly published Robust Cloud Integration with Azure) to show some really slick B2B scenarios with Logic Apps and the Enterprise Integration Pack. Trading Partner and Agreement configuration were shown, along with a special surprise that no one had ever seen before – the world’s smallest X12 834 interchange! It was both a fun and informative session, and if you haven’t at the very least experimented with EDI in Logic Apps – do it. You’ll find your BizTalk Server experience in the same will serve you quite well.

I was up next, wearing a contraption to be explained at a later date. The focus of my talk was to demystify machine learning – and to demonstrate that it’s not just for the sexy applications (e.g., self-driving cars, HoloLens, whatever it is that I’m wearing, etc…). I spent the bulk of my session walking through a simple Hello Azure ML world demo that showed how one could train, operationalize, and then call Azure ML models from within Azure Logic Apps. It is my intention to further refine the models used in this talk and share the full talk, sample code, hardware diagrams, etc. in the summer of 2017.


After I was carted away in a straight jacket, Richard Seroter gave a really cool talk on the intersection between microservices and messaging – and how when using both, one can realize seamless multi-cloud scenarios. It was a very well executed talk with fairly complex demos involving node.js services, java services (built using Spring Boot),  and Logic Apps.


Undeterred by a ruthless cold that had claimed his voice, Jeff Hollan gave an excellent talk on the concept of serverless applications. He opened with an analogy comparing owning/renting/hiring a car with the equivalent on the server-side. He then looked to where serverless would lead the development of applications (i.e., API composition).


Kevin Lam wrapped up the day by going through a list of Enterprise Integration Patterns and the implementation required to make it happen on the Logic Apps side. He also addressed how to increase throughput for Service Bus connections, how to control parallelism, advanced scheduling and other fun goodies that I will likely put to quick use (and maybe follow-up with some blog posts on later). One thing did come as quite the surprise though – Sequential Convoys!

It was a great time, and I hope to be able to share more when I can. Thanks to everyone who attended, and I really hope you all had as great of a time as we did.

Other Locations

QuickLearn Training’s offices were just one of many locations for the event. Below is a short gallery of photos gathered from Twitter of other venues.







New York

(I haven’t been able to find a picture with the camera pointed the other way, but I get it, @wearsy is a model now after all).

New Zealand





BizTalk Server 2016: Using the XslCompiledTransform Class

By Rob Callaway

A few weeks ago, QuickLearn Training hosted a webinar with an overview of a few of the new features in BizTalk Server 2016. This post serves as a proper write-up of the feature that I shared. In this write-up, I’d like to drill a little deeper into the things that were discussed and even explore some other aspects that we simply didn’t have time for. In my portion of the webinar, I spoke about using the XslCompiledTransform class in maps. If you missed the full webinar, check it out over on the QuickLearn Training YouTube channel. If you prefer you can just watch the section on the XslCompiledTransform class.

Comparing XslCompiledTransform and XslTransform Performance

There are so many resources comparing these .NET classes against one another that I’m really not sure that there’s anything I can add to the discussion. The best of these resources is the one I cited in the webinar by Anton Lapounov. Simply put, if you put these two classes in a straight-up foot race, the XslCompiledTransform is going to take longer to load, but will blow away the XslTransform class when it comes to the actual time to transform.

Comparing XslCompiledTransform and XslTransform Behaviors

Now, if you’ve closely followed the features of other releases you may think this isn’t actually a new feature, and you would be mostly correct. You see, in BizTalk Server 2013 the mapping engine was changed to utilize the XslCompiledTransform class instead of the XslTransform class that the mapping engine had been using since BizTalk Server 2004. While this change was made to reap the performance benefits of the XslCompiledTransform class over the XslTransform class, it was a change that Microsoft made unilaterally to all BizTalk maps compiled for BizTalk Server 2013. While the intention was pure, this change wasn’t universally welcomed by BizTalk developers. There are several great write-ups exploring issues that arose in existing maps when updated (for example this great blog post from Dan Rosanova, or just the Known Issues for BizTalk Server 2013). In case you’re pressed for time and can’t read those, the issues arise from the differences in behavior between the XslCompiledTransform class and the XslTransform class. The specific differences are:

  • If an input XML field is empty or contains a false value, the Scripting functoid will treat the input as a true
  • The XslCompiledTransform class only supports calling public methods
  • The XslCompiledTransform class does not support returning null
  • In the XslCompiledTransform class, function overloads are differentiated by number of parameters rather than types
  • The XslCompiledTransform class utilizes the XPathArrayIterator type rather than the XPathSelectionIterator type for looping through repeating records within the Scripting Your script must call the MoveNext() method to advance properly

While these five changes may seem relatively trivial, for some people they presented issues that completely broke their maps. There is a registry setting which allows you to tell the mapping engine to use the XslTransform class, but the change is applied globally to all maps and negates the potential performance gains offered by the XslCompiledTransform.

Setting the Transform Class for a Map

BizTalk Server 2016 now surfaces the option for the transformation class as a UI element. Furthermore, the transformation class isn’t specified globally, but instead we can set it for each map separately. So, any maps I’m upgrading that are negatively affected by the XslCompiledTransform class can target the XslTransform class. This ability to opt-in or opt-out gives us true backward compatibility that was sorely missing in the previous releases.

By default, any new or existing maps that you are upgrading will target the XslTransform class (for backward compatibility), but setting the transform class for the map couldn’t be easier. In your map, if you go to the Properties for the map grid, you will see a new property named Use XSL Transform (the default is True and indicates that the XslTransform class will be used). If you change it to False, the XslCompiledTransform is targeted instead. There is a third option for the property, Undefined. If you choose this option, that map will check the same registry settings used in earlier releases to control the transformation class.

Configuring the Use XSL Transform property

Answering an Unanswered Question

I don’t really want to rehash my test process or results, as you can watch the webinar or download the slides to get all of that. Instead, I wanted to answer a question that was posed in the webinar that I was unprepared to answer. Niyati asked if the increase in performance would have been the same if I were calling the map in an orchestration. This configuration was not part of my initial round of tests, but I cracked open my solution, and created an orchestration so I could definitively show whether it was true or not.

My orchestration has the simplest design possible. It receives the message, runs the map, and sends the transformed message out.

Orchestration used to test the XslCompiledTransform map

I made one of these babies that runs the XslCompiledTransform map, and another that runs the XslTransform map.

I went crazy in my testing and processed 10,000 instances of each orchestration using my batch file submission method. I’m not going to write a full-blown analysis of the results because I think the numbers speak for themselves.

The XslCompiledTransform class once again executed much faster

But That’s Not All

I had a lot of fun exploring transformation classes in preparation for this webinar and I really look forward to the next one. Please be on the lookout for details on that webinar in the coming weeks.

If you need to learn more about measuring and analyzing BizTalk Server performance, tuning performance, or controlling the throttling behaviors in BizTalk Server you really should check out our BizTalk Server Administrator Deep Dive course.